National Poetry Month

Posted:  Sunday, April 9, 2017 - 4:45pm
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 National Poetry Month, which takes place each April, is a celebration of poetry introduced in 1996 and organized by the Academy of American Poets as a way to increase awareness and appreciation of poetry in the United States. While this may sound like a ‘ dry as dust’ sort of celebration, it encourages people  to  explore and enjoy the written and spoken word. Poetry  can be intensely personal, silly or profound. It can be set in measured stanzas and  rhyme or wander all over the page.  It sings to us , comforts us and sometimes scolds or makes us laugh. In honor of National Poetry Month  I am sharing the works of two poets that embody the differences , e. e. cummings , who wanders about the page  and Maine’s own Edna St C Vincent  Millay, who draws a picture of the view from the top of the Camden Hills that embodies  our fair state in a more traditional format.

 e. e. Cummings

IN Just-                      
spring when the world is mud-                      
luscious the little                      
lame baloonman                      
                       
whistles far and wee                      
                       
and eddieandbill come                      
running from marbles and                      
piracies and it's                      
spring                      
                       
when the world is puddle-wonderful                      
                       
the queer                      
old baloonman whistles                      
far and wee                      
and bettyandisbel come dancing                      
                       
from hop-scotch and jump-rope and                      
                       
it's                      
spring                      
and                      
the                      
                       
goat-footed                      
                       
baloonMan whistles                      
far                      
and                      
wee
( In Just was originally published in The Dial Volume LXVIII, Number 5 , in May  1920.

 

Renascence  (verse one)

Edna St. Vincent Millay, 1892 - 1950

 

All I could see from where I stood
Was three long mountains and a wood;
I turned and looked another way,
And saw three islands in a bay.
So with my eyes I traced the line 
Of the horizon, thin and fine,
Straight around till I was come
Back to where I’d started from; 
And all I saw from where I stood
Was three long mountains and a wood.